Degree Programs

Doctor of Optometry

Courses
First Year First Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 521 Geometric and Visual Optics I 4.0
V 542 Systems Approach to Biomedical Sciences I 5.0
V 540 Ocular Biology 4.0
V 550 Clinical Sciences I 3.0
V 574 Intro to Epidemiology and Optometric Research 2.0
Total Credit Hours 18.0
First Year Second Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 501 Integrative Optometry I 2.0
V 523 Geometric & Visual Optics II 4.0
V 543 Systems Approach to Biomedical Sciences II 4.5
V 551 Clinical Sciences II: Motility and Refraction 3.0
V 552 Clinical Sciences II: Anterior Segment Examination Techniques 2.0
V 560 Vision Science I: Perception 3.5
Total Credit Hours 19.0
Second Year First Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 631 Optics III: Ophthalmic 4.0
V 642 General Pharmacology I 4.0
V 652 Clinical Sciences III: Accommodation & Binocular Vision 3.0
V 653 Clinical Sciences III: Posterior Segment Examination Techniques 2.0
V 665 Vision Science II: Ocular Motility 2.5
Total Credit Hours 15.5
Second Year Second Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 632 Optics IV: Advanced Clinical Optics 4.0
V 633 Contact Lenses 3.0
V 644 Ocular Disease I 3.0
V 646 Ocular Pharmacology 3.0
V 654 Clinical Sciences IV 4.0
V 666 Vision Science III: Binocular Vision 4.0
Total Credit Hours 21.0
Summer Session
Course Credit Hours
V 680 Introduction to Clinic 2.5
Third Year First Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 701 Grand Rounds I 0.5
V 740 Ocular Disease V: Advanced Clinical Procedures 2.0
V 745 Ocular Disease II 3.0
V 748 Physical Assessment and Medicine 3.5
V 752 Advanced Contact Lens Topics 2.0
V 756 Clinical Assessment I 1.0
V 781 Pediatric Optometry 3.0
V 786 Optometry Clinic 3.0
V 787 Optometry Clinic 3.0
Total Credit Hours 19.0
Third Year Second Semester
Course Credit Hours
V 702 Grand Rounds II 0.5
V 746 Ocular Disease III: Neuro-Optometry 2.0
V 749 Ocular Disease IV: Applied Ocular Therapeutics 3.0
V 751 Low Vision Rehabilitation 3.0
V 754 Optometric Profession (Public Health, Policy, Legal, History & Ethical Issues) 2.0
V 757 Clinical Assessment II 1.0
V 758 Advanced Clinical Concepts in Binocular Vision and Pediatrics 2.0
V 759 Business Aspects of Optometry 2.0
V 740 Ocular Disease V: Advanced Clinical Procedures 2.0
V 788 Optometry Clinic 3.0
V 789 Optometry Clinic 3.0
Total Credit Hours 23.5
Fourth Year
Course Credit Hours
V 885 Optometry Clinic (Bloomington) 10.0
V 887 Extension Clinic (Indianapolis) 10.0
V 888 External Clinic 10.0
Fourth Clinical Assignment: V 885, V 887, V 888 10.0
Total Credit Hours 40.0
Clinical Improvement
Course Credit Hours
V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement-3rd year 2.0
V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement-4th year 5.0
O.D. Degree Program course descriptions

The number of credit hours given a course is indicated in parentheses following the course title. The abbreviation "P" refers to the course prerequisite(s). The abbreviation "C" refers to courses that are corequisite(s). Unless otherwise noted, the prerequisites for all courses include enrollment in the School of Optometry and permission of the instructor.

  • OPT-V 501 Integrative Optometry (2cr.) This course sequence is offered over two semesters. Overall goal is to provide an integrated perspective of optometry in the paradigm of problem-based learning (PBL) and an introduction to inter-professional education. The problems will be clinical cases which relate to the contents of courses taught contemporaneously in optics, biomedical, and ocular biology modules. Students will meet in small groups to discuss the problems guided by a faculty facilitator.
  • OPT-V 521 Optics I: Geometric and Visual Optics (4cr.) P: Physics P 202 or permission of instructor. Fundamentals of geometric, physical and visual optics. Optical analysis of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Components of the eyes and their optical properties. Clinical instrumentation for optical measurement and diagnosis of eyes.
  • OPT-V 523 Optics II: Geometric and Visual Optics (4cr.) P: V 521 or permission of instructor. Continuation of application of the principles of geometrical, physical and visual optics to the optical description and correction of the eye. Schematic optical models of the eye. Measurement of light. Higher-order aberrations and their impact on vision.
  • OPT-V 540 Ocular Biology I (4cr.) Head and neck neuroanatomy related to the normal functioning of the eye and visual system. Detailed anatomy/histology and physiology of the eye and adnexa. Maintenance of optical transparency, intraocular pressure and phototransduction.
  • OPT-V 542 Systems Approach to Biomedical Sciences I (SABS-I) (5.5cr.) This is the first of a two-semester sequence which presents basic science information organized and specific organ systems. The course will cover common processes: basic biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, fundamentals of physiology, immunology/infection, and oncology. The organ systems are organized to discuss the structure, function, and pathology for each organ system, including nervous system, musculoskeletal system and skin.
  • OPT-V 543 Systems Approach to Biomedical Sciences II (4.5cr.) P: V 542. Continuation of SABS-I.
  • OPT-V 550 Clinical Sciences I (3cr.) Introduction to clinical history and interview techniques, health history content, and medical record documentation as applied to the optometric setting; optometric and medical terminology, interview techniques for special populations, legal aspects of medical records, differential diagnosis of visual symptoms, introduction to physical assessment, slit lamp biomicroscopy and ophthalmoscopy.
  • OPT-V 551 Clinical Sciences I: Motility and Refraction (3cr.) P: V 550 Vision examination techniques and theory. Application of vision testing instrumentation with emphasis on preliminary test, motility and refractive tests. The study of the principles involved in the measurement, epidemiology, and treatment of ametropia, oculomotor imbalances, and associated conditions.
  • OPT-V 552 Clinical Sciences II: Anterior Segment Examination Techniques (2cr.) P: V 550 Introduction to techniques used to examine and evaluate the health of the anterior segment of the eye, including use of the slit lamp biomicroscope, clinical measurement of intra-ocular pressure, foreign body evaluation and removal. Other techniques will be introduced as appropriate.
  • OPT-V 554 Optometric Profession I  (0.5cr.) This is the first of a three-semester sequence which presents the optometric profession through the history of the profession, the fundamentals and principles of public health and optometry's role in the healthcare community, professionalism and ethics, cultural competency, current issues and professional affairs, licensure and scope of practice, and professional development. The course will be presented in seminar format.
  • OPT-V 560 Vision Science I (Perception) (3.5cr.) Provides an understanding of how visual performance is determined by the underlying biology of the eye and the brain. Topics include visual pathway, neuroanatomy and physiology, with special emphasis on the roles of receptive and neural sampling.
  • OPT-V 569 Selected Studies (elective, cr. arr.cr.) Items of current scientific interest. Consideration given to students' special interests. May include writing of abstracts and reviews of current vision science literature. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
  • OPT-V 574 Introduction to Epidemiology & Optometric Research (2cr.) Introduction to epidemiology and biostatistics, principles of epidemiological inquiry and research design, and the application of statistical methods to clinical data.
  • OPT-V 601 Integrative Optometry (2cr.) This course sequence is offered over two semesters. Overall goal is to provide an integrated perspective of optometry in the paradigm of problem-based learning (PBL), including a second-level IPE exposure. The problems will be clinical cases which relate to the contents of courses taught contemporaneously in optics, biomedical, and ocular biology modules. Students will meet in small groups to discuss the problems guided by a faculty facilitator.
  • OPT-V 631 Optics III: Ophthalmic Optics (4cr.) P: V 523 or permission of instructor. Design and application of ophthalmic spectacles and materials.
  • OPT-V 632 Optics IV: Ophthalmic and Advanced Clinical Optics (4cr.) P: V 631 or permission of instructor. Continuation of design and application of ophthalmic spectacles and materials. Optics of low vision and contact lenses; optics of objective refraction and fundus imaging; optics of diseased eyes and wavefront-based treatments.
  • OPT-V 633 Contact Lenses (3cr.) P: V 652 and V 653. Theory and practice of contact lenses. General principles of lens materials, design, and care; examination, selection, and fitting; diagnosis and treatment of lens wear problems; introduction to specialty fitting. Practical laboratory on lens handling, modification, and fitting.
  • OPT-V 642 General Pharmacology (4cr.) P: V 543. Basic principles of pharmacology. Mechanisms of action and side effects of: anti-inflammatory, autonomic, cardiovascular, autacoid, respiratory, CNS, anti-diabetic, chemotherapeutic, immune system, and GI drugs.
  • OPT-V 644 Ocular Disease I: Anterior Segment (3cr.) P: V 543. A detailed description of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of ocular disease of the anterior segment.
  • OPT-V 646 Ocular Pharmacology (2cr.) P: V 642. 

    This course includes a detailed description of the mechanisms, clinical applications, side effects and contraindications of ocular pharmacological agents used in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular disease. Ocular effects of systemic medications are covered.

  • OPT-V 652 Clinical Sciences III: Accommodation and Binocular Vision (3cr.) P: V 551 and V 552. Vision examination techniques, theory and application of vision testing instrumentation, with emphasis on accommodation and binocular vision; accommodation and vergence test findings as they relate to normal function, subjective symptoms, and performance; theory and case analysis of non-strabismic binocular vision problems.
  • OPT-V 653 Clinical Sciences III: Posterior Segment Examination Techniques (2cr.) P: V 551 and V 552. Introduction to techniques used to examine and evaluate the health of the posterior segment of the eye, including direct ophthalmoscopy, monocular and binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, and posterior pole imaging techniques. Other techniques will be introduced as appropriate.
  • OPT-V 654 Clinical Sciences IV: Clinical Analysis and Communication (4cr.) P: V 652 and V 653. Advanced clinical analysis, procedures, and protocols for examinations of patients in the clinical setting, and comprehensive eye and vision examinations with scheduled patients; patient assessment and plan, patient communication; introduction to clinical ocular disease and protocols.
  • OPT-V 655 Optometric Profession II (.05cr.) P: V 652, V 653 and V 654. 

    This is the second of a three-semester sequence which presents the optometric profession through the history of the profession, the fundamentals and principles of public health, and optometry's role in the healthcare community, professionalism and ethics, cultural competency, current issues and professional affairs, licensure and scope of practice, and professional development. The course will be presented in seminar format.

  • OPT-V 665 Vision Science II: Ocular Motility (2.5cr.) Characteristics, control, and deficits of the five somatic eye-movement systems (convergence, saccadic version, pursuit version, fixation maintenance, vestibular reflex) and the autonomic systems subserving accommodation and pupillary diameter and reflexes.
  • OPT-V 666 Vision Science III Binocular Vision (4cr.) P: V 560, V 652 & V 665. This course is intended to prepare the student to manage the common binocular vision anomalies encountered in primary care optometry. The course will examine the anatomical, physiological, psychophysical, and oculomotor characteristics of normal binocularity in humans. The course will then present diagnosis and management strategies for both non-strabismic and strabismic patients.
  • OPT-V 678 Ophthalmic Dispensing Clinic  (2cr.) Clinical experience in appropriate frame and lens selection, facial measurement for eye wear fitting, verification of finished prescription accuracy and spectacle alignment, adjusting and dispensing of eye wear for comfort and optical accuracy, and repair of eyewear. 
  • OPT-V 680 Introduction to Clinic (Summer Clinic) (2.5cr.) P: Students must be in good academic standing, have completed all lecture and laboratory courses with a passing grade through the second professional year of study, and have passed the V 654 competency examination. 

    Introduction to clinical practice in visual analysis, optometric procedures, case conference; discussion and patient care for three 40-hour weeks during the summer, or the equivalent by arrangement.

  • OPT-V 701 Grand Rounds I (0.5cr.) Presentation of cases.
  • OPT-V 702 Grand Rounds II (0.5cr.) Presentation of cases.
  • OPT-V 740 Ocular Disease V: Lasers, Injections, and Minor Surgical Procedures  (2cr.) P: V 746 and V 788 C: V 749 

    Learn advanced anterior segment procedures and treatment modalities, including laser procedures, injection techniques, minor surgical procedures, and wound closure techniques.  Students will also learn aseptic technique, how to manage office emergencies, and other topics as appropriate.

  • OPT-V 745 Ocular Disease II: Posterior Segment (3cr.) P: V 644. A detailed description of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of ocular disease of the posterior segment; neurological diseases affecting the eye; and application of ocular therapeutics.
  • OPT-V 746 Ocular Disease III (Neuro-Optometry) (2cr.) P: V 745. A detailed discussion of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of neurological diseases affecting the eye.
  • OPT-V 748 Principles and Methods of Physical Assessment and Medicine (3.5cr.) P: V 680. Physical examination with emphasis on HEENT and neurological screening, and their relationship to ocular health conditions and medical management; clinical chemistry and interpretation of clinical laboratory tests; criteria for referral to other providers, and emergency office procedures.
  • OPT-V 749 Ocular Disease IV (Applied Ocular Therapeutics) (3cr.) P: V 745. The use, in clinical optometric practice, of legend drugs, lasers, and other therapeutic devices in the treatment and management of ocular disease.
  • OPT-V 751 Low Vision Rehabilitation (3cr.) P: V 652 and V 654. Special examination procedures and patient management techniques for the visually impaired. Evaluations and prescriptions of optical, nonoptical, and electronic devices. Overview of rehabilitative services.
  • OPT-V 752 Advanced Contact Lens Topics I (2cr.) P: V 633 Applications of contact lenses. This course covers the fitting and care of patients requiring specialty contact lenses and more difficult cases including, but not limited to, correcting astigmatism, tinted and cosmetic lenses, fitting the presbyopic patient, fitting infants and children, fitting keratoconic patients, fitting postsurgical and other distorted corneas; haptic lenses, cosmetic shells, and prosthetic eyes.
  • OPT-V 754 Optometric Profession III (Public Health Policy, Legal, Historical and Ethical Issues) (1cr.) Introduction to the fundamentals and principles of public health; an overview of public and community health problems, planning and care, with special attention to optometric and other visual aspects of variously identified segments of the community. Includes considerations of quality, efficiency, economics, and regulation of vision and health care delivery and utilization.
  • OPT-V 756 Clinical Assessment I (1cr.) P: V 680. C: V 745. Introduction to clinical reasoning and formulation of differential diagnostic protocols for investigation of various visual problems.
  • OPT-V 758 Advanced Clinical Concepts in Binocular Vision and Pediatrics (2cr.) P: V 666, V 680, V 781. The goal of this course is to provide the students with advanced knowledge in the areas of binocular vision and pediatrics. Topics covered will include clinical cases involving amyblyopia, strabismus, infants, and vision therapy among others. Classes will be a mixture of case presentations and lecture. Students will have an enhanced understanding of how to diagnose and treat patients with these disorders upon completion of the course.
  • OPT-V 757 Clinical Assessment II (1cr.) P: V 756. A continuation in the clinical reasoning and formulation of differential diagnostic protocols for investigation of various visual problems.
  • OPT-V 759 Business Aspects of Optometry (2cr.) The business of optometric practices and related career opportunities within optometry.
  • OPT-V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement-3rd (2-2.5cr.) Increased supervision provided by clinical faculty for students having difficulty in areas of clinical performance.
  • OPT-V 781 Pediatric Optometry (3cr.) P: V 666 and V680. Specialized diagnosis and management strategies for the infant and child. Topics to include refractive and binocular vision anomalies, disease, pharmacology and an Optometrist's role in assessment and management of visual perception, learning disabilities and reading problems. Communication with parents, educators and other professionals.
  • OPT-V 782 Preservation of Clinical Skills (3-5cr.) P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789  

    Supervision by Clinical Faculty on the clinic floor for students who did not receive a passing grade in a third year didactic course. Allows students to maintain clinical knowledge while they are completing third year coursework.  

  • OPT-V 786 Optometry Clinic (2cr.) P: V 680 with a minimum grade of C. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.
  • OPT-V 787 Optometry Clinic (2cr.) P: V 786 with a minimum grade of C. A continuation of V 786. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.
  • OPT-V 788 Optometry Clinic (2cr.) P: V 787 with a minimum grade of C. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis, case presentation by student interns. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.
  • OPT-V 789 Optometry Clinic (2cr.) P: V 788 with a minimum grade of C. Continuation of V 788. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis, case presentation by student interns. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.
  • OPT-V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement-4th year (5-10cr.) Increased supervision provided by clinical faculty for students having difficulty in areas of clinical performance.
  • OPT-V 884 Optometry Clinic-Arranged (5cr.) P: P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as successful completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. Advanced clinical optometric training with emphasis on optometric specialties such as contact lens care, ocular disease diagnosis/management, binocular vision analysis/therapy, and pediatrics.
  • OPT-V 885 Optometry Clinic (10cr.) P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. Advanced clinical optometric training with emphasis on optometric specialties such as contact lens care, ocular disease diagnosis/ management, binocular vision analysis/ therapy, and pediatrics.
  • OPT-V 887 Extension Clinic (10cr.) P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. An intensive, hands-on patient care experience at a large urban optometry clinic in Indianapolis. Includes experience in primary care as well as specialty services.
  • OPT-V 888 External Clinic (10cr.) P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. An intensive, hands-on patient care experience at an affiliated external clinical site such as a military hospital, Veterans Administration medical facility, or referral eye center.